Democracy.com

4
General Election

Nov 04, 2014

5days until next election

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Looking Back

After two years of serving you on the city council, I’m asking for your vote so that I can serve as the city’s first directly elected mayor.

I’m proud of all that we’ve accomplished together, and look forward to continuing the work we’ve begun to more effectively address issues related to quality of life here in our beautiful coastal community. My focus will remain on providing the core services of public safety, transportation infrastructure—including safer routes to ride your bike or walk—and environmental initiatives.

But our work has not been without controversy and disagreement. Here are some of the bigger issues that have come up and my position on them:

Density Bonus Developments

The state Density Bonus Law has been used in Encinitas to build infill projects that have homes that are too big and have reduced yards and driveways that make them an eyesore when compared to the rest of the neighborhood. We’ve been working to change the parts of our ordinances that are applied to ALL developments, so that Density Bonus projects will also be more in line with our ideas of community character.

The result has been a lawsuit by the Building Industry Association (BIA) on behalf of developers. We recently voted to defend the lawsuit and will continue to work on ways to adjust our policies so that new development doesn’t drastically alter our neighborhoods.

Right to Vote on Upzoning

The initiative known as “Prop A” was promoted as “the Right to Vote on Upzoning,” a right I fully support. In fact, early in 2013, I voted with a unanimous city council to remove the provision of the General Plan that had been added (ironically, by then Councilmember Pam Slater-Price) which allowed for the city council to bypass a public vote with a “supermajority” vote. (Two “Specific Plans” for the Highway 101 corridor were approved by 5-0, including a vote for upzoning in Leucadia by then Councilmember Sheila Cameron.)

After Prop A signatures were submitted and certified, the legal analysis of the initiative determined that the “Specific Plans” for Highway 101 would be changed without the benefit of a single public hearing, something that Prop A had as a REQUIREMENT for changes to land use plans. Since I believe in the importance of public hearings before changing land use plans, I withdrew my support for the initiative.

Downtown Bars

I recognized years ago that the nightlife in downtown had become a problem for the residential neighborhoods on each side of the 101 corridor, as well as the other businesses and organizations that have long been a part of the downtown mix. I have always been dedicated to ensuring that our existing laws about noise and nuisances were more effectively enforced and that alcohol-serving establishments took responsibility for maintaining an environment that reduced the impacts their businesses caused in their neighborhoods.

In addition to the focus on enforcement, I also agreed that we should draft a Deemed Approved Ordinance (DAO) as a backup, in case we needed more laws to solve the problems. Stepped-up enforcement has established what our next steps need to be, and if it becomes clear that a DAO is the only way to reign in the nightlife, I will vote to pass it. This has always been my approach, and I feel good about the progress we’re making.

Save Pacific View

For more than 10 years, the City and Encinitas Union School District have been bickering about the school district’s desire to sell Pacific View School. Since the land was donated for a public purpose in 1883, I wanted to do everything I could to keep it public property. So I worked with councilmembers Teresa Barth and Lisa Shaffer to use city resources to purchase the site.

Over the long public debate, I heard many proposals to convert the school to an Arts Center. And since our community has a great many artists and patrons of the arts, I agreed with this general concept and look forward to the public planning process that will take place now that the city will own the property.

***

In closing, let me say that as your mayor, I will continue to work to ensure your voices are heard, and that our quality of life is protected. My track record shows that I work hard, I listen, and I get the job done.

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11

Thu Sep 11, 2014

Tony Kranz for Mayor Campaign Kickoff

5:30 - 7:30 pm
The home of Cynthia & Tony Kranz
1086 Hygeia Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024

Kicking-Off the Campaign
In Support Of


Tony Kranz
who is working to be elected as
Mayor of Encinitas

Enjoy the music of
The Degher Family
Darius, Cleopatra and Cordelia

If you've already contributed and plan to attend, please send an email to meet@tonykranz.com.

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August 5, 2014

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Stand With Me. Join my Campaign for Mayor!

The 'nomination period' formally opened for candidates to get on the November ballot.  I was the first major candidate for Mayor to officially pull papers.  In this photo, neighborhood leader Jennifer Amundsen, signs my papers for Mayor and joins my campaign. Thanks Jen!

And as mayor, I'll put Encinitas first. That's why, in this November's election, I'm asking for your support and vote to put me first -- becoming Encinitas' first directly elected Mayor in the city's history.

Will you chip in $10 or more today to help get my name on the ballot?  I'm running to provide strong leadership for Encinitas' future, but I need your help.

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July 31, 2014

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Switchfoot Bro-Am at Moonlight Beach...Giving Back To Our Community

I was glad to join the huge crowd enjoying Switchfoot at Moonlight Beach, on a beautiful afternoon on July 12, standing shoulder to shoulder, experiencing an outstanding musical performance and surf contest for a great cause, helping homeless kids. Locals doing good works for 10 years. Thank you Switchfoot for all you do to give back to our community, making Encinitas a better place to live.

Bro-Am 2014 July 12th Moonlight Beach Encinitas, CA Bro-Am is an annual celebration that gives back to the San Diego community. Now in its tenth year, the event has grown in size and impact, encompassing a surf contest, music festival, and fundraiser for local children's charities and homeless kids.

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July 31, 2014

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Encinitas Gearing Up For Housing Element

June 23, 2014 Encinitas Advocate by Jared Whitlock  

The city will soon roll out community workshops and an online forum to collect input for the housing element.

The goal is to put the housing element — a map listing locations throughout the city that can accommodate state-mandated housing — to a public vote in 2016.

During the workshops and virtual town hall meetings, residents will be asked to identify where units could be located in their respective communities.

As a starting point of conversation, the public will be presented with maps of candidate sites throughout the city, which are based on recommendations from three groups made up of citizen and business representatives.

To get the word out about chances to weigh in, the city will send out a mailer and engage residents online. The City Council received an overview of the housing element’s next steps. In addition, the council directed staff to rewrite outreach materials at the June 18 meeting.

 

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July 31, 2014

Updated Post

Sustainable Living Is Growing To New Heights: Encinitas Could Soon Grow Fruit In City Playgrounds And Parks

[click here to view the Fox 5 video]

March 4, 2014 ENCINITAS, Calif. – An Encinitas councilman proposed planting fruit trees in public areas within the city, including parks and playgrounds.

The plan would call for a volunteer effort to not just to plant the trees but also harvest them. The fruit then would be donated to a growing number of families who are food insecure.

“It reminds people that trees aren’t just for looking at, but that they provide food that people can eat,” said Councilman Tony Kranz.

The measure is still in its beginning stages.

Kranz said a volunteer committee will be finding out which open areas are best suited for planting fruit trees.

“We’re not interested in planting fruits in the median, because we don’t want people crossing in the middle of the road to pick an orange,” said Kranz.

 

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